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It all begins with a moment of inspiration

1. December 2017

After completing a degree in computer science, Lukasz Wolejko-Wolejszo eventually decided to switch career and enter the world of advertising. The social media expert and project manager often gets involved in elaborating concepts for his clients. For example, while working on one particular website design, the kind of attractive imaging he was looking for proved elusive. So without further ado, he created it himself.

Portrait LukaszLukasz hasn’t developed a website for a long time now, as his passion for photography has since become a full-time job – one which sees him travelling the world and skilfully plying his trade as an internationally acclaimed photographer working on magazines, advertising campaigns and lookbooks. 

 

To photograph the lookbook for WOOD FELLAS, the film buff left his adopted home of Berlin behind. His shoot for the latest eyewear designs took him to the Zugspitze mountain range in Bavaria then on to Munich’s Botanical Gardens. Surrounded by nature and with a waterfall in the background, this must have been an unusual set – even by his standards. 

What would you say is your best photo?

 

I can’t answer that – for me, there’s no such thing as “the” best photo. Taking a good photo depends on many different factors: good styling, good make-up, good models, interesting set design and, most importantly, the right light. I associate many of my photos with wonderful moments. I’ve been involved in a whole host of productions where the perfect photo could only be obtained in a very special way. The photo shoot with the cat that kept running away is a prime example.

Lukasz KatzeAnd dito for today’s shoot with WOOD FELLAS, which involved working in an extreme situation next to a waterfall. The equipment was literally swimming and we had to cover everything with plastic film. But it was worth the effort, because we eventually managed to take some sensational pictures, the sort of thing an eyewear manufacturer had never come up with before. And dito for today’s shoot with WOOD FELLAS, which involved working in an extreme situation next to a waterfall. The equipment was literally swimming and we had to cover everything with plastic film. But it was worth the effort, because we eventually managed to take some sensational pictures, the sort of thing an eyewear manufacturer had never come up with before.

 

And dito for today’s shoot with WOOD FELLAS, which involved working in an extreme situation next to a waterfall. The equipment was literally swimming and we had to cover everything with plastic film. But it was worth the effort, because we eventually managed to take some sensational pictures, the sort of thing an eyewear manufacturer had never come up with before.

 

 

How do you plan a shoot for a company such as WOOD FELLAS?

 

It’s quite a long process. It all begins with a moment of inspiration that comes to me during day-to-day life. It might be a song I’m listening to, it might be a snapshot in time I experience with my girlfriend – and things then snowball from there. I build a concept on this initial inspiration, which I then propose to the brands and use to develop the complete story together with the client.

 

 

What do you need to bear in mind when photographing eyewear?

 

It’s usually very technical and mostly a matter of showing specific details particularly clearly. Other clients might be looking more to convey a special feeling or mood with their lookbook. There is far more scope for bringing emotions into play in a lookbook, especially when cut-outs are used. The focus here must be placed first and foremost on the material and the shape, and that must then fit together with the model and the background, of course.

 

 

To what extent do you identify with brands in your work?

 

Naturally, the brands I work with are very important to me. Although I’m always 500% committed to my work, of course, the more a product appeals to my own tastes, the more of my heart goes into it. With the shoot for WOOD FELLAS, the set was just right, as I love being around nature. The models were great too, and as someone who likes wearing hoodies the styling also struck a chord with me, meaning that I could identify with the whole production far more than is usually the case.

How else do you incorporate sustainability into your day-to-day life?

 

I try to do quite a lot, whether it’s small things at home, clothing or recycling in general. I photographed the Pinqpong campaign. The materials for Pinqpong’s bags are made 100 per cent from recycled PET bottles. I find that fascinating and for this reason they’re another client I can identify very easily with.

 

 

If you could design some WOOD FELLAS glasses, what would they look like?

 

Very minimalist with a slender, round frame. I don’t know how thin frames can be when they’re made from wood. But during the shoot we had some “Solln” glasses from WOOD FELLAS that use a mixture of wood and acetate. I thought they were really beautiful.

Lukasz Munich Trainstation by Benjamin Jehne